Author: Rich Novicky

C+K Plastics Expands Capabilities, Celebrates 55 Years in Manufacturing

METUCHEN, N.J.—C+K Plastics, Inc., recently took delivery of new equipment that expands its manufacturing capabilities and announced that 2018 marks its 55th year in business. C+K Plastics manufactures thermoformed plastic products and assemblies for the aerospace, agriculture, food service, refrigeration, and other industries, The expansion includes a large-format, four-station thermoformer with the ability to provide twin sheet and pressure forming.  The unit is installed in C&K’s Conyers, Georgia facility and came online in the fall of 2017. “The new machine will enable us to make very large parts—up to 8 feet x 12 feet, or twin sheet up to 7 feet x 10 feet—for specialized medical and transportation applications,” said C+K Vice President Sales and Marketing David Grice, in a press release. “It can form any kind of material and holds tighter tolerances to offer the kind of finish quality associated with injection molding.” “This investment serves to make us more efficient,” said C+K President Bob Carrier.  “With shorter heating and forming cycles, we can make more parts in a given amount of time. That gives us an opportunity to bring injection molding parts into the thermoforming world.  We’re now able to deliver injection-molded appearance at vacuum forming prices.” C+K Plastics, Inc. (www.candkplastics.com) serves a broad range of markets, including aerospace, agriculture, food service, refrigeration, and others. The Metuchen, New Jersey-based enterprise couples its offerings with those of its...

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NanoPrecision Products Achieves AS 9100D Certification

EL SEGUNDO, Calif.—NanoPrecision Products, a company that says it provides complex material forming with nanometer accuracies and tolerances, recently announced that it received AS9100D and ISO 9001:2015 certifications from the independent certifying body, Perry Johnson. The AS9100D and ISO 9001:2015 certifications confirm that the company’s quality system meets all quality and safety requirements specific to the aerospace industry. NanoPrecision Products offers complex material forming with what it calls “revolutionary 3D stamping processes that deliver nanometer accuracies and tolerances.” Its agility in moving to the new, more robust set of certifications makes nanoPrecision Products one of the first companies serving the aerospace industry to qualify under the new standards. The internationally recognized AS9100D and ISO 9001:2015 certifications are established to ensure the quality of products and services of a company, and new guidelines that were issued for each certification give companies three years to transition to the new standards. These must be in place by September 2018, and at that time, the 2008 certifications will be invalid. Both certifications are required for securing major contracts from companies in each sector. Beyond benefiting the military and aerospace industries, the AS9100D certification also provides overarching benefits to the telecommunications, data communications, consumer electronics, medical device, automotive, oil/logging, and supercomputing industries. Founded in 2002, nanoPrecision Products (www.nanoprecision.com) reports that it produces products with total cost of ownership advantages, at scalable volumes, and with...

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Sanmina Receives 2017 Supplier Excellence Premier Award From Raytheon

SAN JOSE, Calif.—Raytheon Co. recently awarded Sanmina Corporation its Premier Supplier Excellence Award for Sanmina’s outstanding achievements. Raytheon gives the award to suppliers who have demonstrated premier achievement for Raytheon in business management, technology, partnership, or affordability. Only the highest achieving suppliers are awarded this honor, the company said in a press release. Sanmina’s Costa Mesa, California, facility received Raytheon’s Premier Award for excellence in technology, quality, and delivery performance. The award recognizes Sanmina’s leadership and expertise in the high reliability interconnect technologies required for Raytheon’s mission-critical military and aerospace products. Sanmina’s technology center in Costa Mesa specializes in advanced flex, rigid flex, and printed circuit board technology, memory, printed circuit board assembly, and system integration. The company specializes in the most advanced flex circuits, and printed circuit boards with up to 70 layers and other new technology. Raytheon Company, with 2016 sales of $24 billion and 63,000 employees, specializes in products for defense, civil government, and cybersecurity. “We are very proud of this award, and Raytheon’s recognition of our commitment to technical innovation, operations excellence, and customer focus,” said Rich Kampf, president of Sanmina’s Interconnect Systems Division, in a statement. “The Sanmina and Raytheon engineering teams are strong partners in the development of new capabilities and processes that support some of Raytheon’s most advanced products.” Sanmina (www.Sanmina.com) has 20 design, manufacturing, and technology centers in the U.S., giving customers a...

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Miro Manufacturing Adds Fabrication and Assembly Center

WAUKESHA, Wis.—Miro Manufacturing has acquired property and a facility located less than a mile from its main campus to serve as the company’s fabrication and assembly center. The addition provides the company with more than 60,000 square feet of manufacturing space, the company said in a press release. Miro’s fabrication services include laser and waterjet cutting, forming, and welding.  Its assembly services vary from simple two-part sub-assemblies to complete product assembly.  The expansion of these operations accommodates what today’s customer is looking for—a partner to provide multiple, complementary services empowering them to reduce their supply chain, according to Miro (www.miromfg.com). The company also recently announced the addition of a Komatsu 330-ton servo press outfitted with a 36-inch coil feed line to enhance its metal stamping operation.  The new equipment will complement Miro’s current battery of metal stamping presses, which range in tonnage from 60 tons to 1,000 tons. A Komatsu servo press is a complete integrated press system that utilizes technology to improve the entire stamping process. There are three key differences between servo and mechanical presses—accuracy, repeatability, and power. Stroke, slide motion, slide position, and speed are all programmable and adjustable. These advancements are intended to further Miro’s overall position as a  contract manufacturer—versatile enough to handle major projects, yet flexible enough to react quickly to a customer’s changing needs. Miro’s diverse services include metal stamping, fabrication, machining, and...

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Keystone Electronics Moves to New Facility

NEW HYDE PARK, N.Y.—Keystone Electronics, a provider of electronic interconnect components and hardware, recently moved its corporate headquarters and manufacturing operations to a new facility, the company said in a press release. Located at 55 South Denton Ave. in New Hyde Park, New York, the new facility is designed to greatly improve efficiencies and productivity and is  double the size of Keystone’s former facility in Astoria, New York. The move is the second part of a company expansion that began in 2016 with the company’s fulfillment center and quality lab. “We are excited with the expansion of our company and look forward to better serving the needs of all of our customers and the industry as a whole,” said Troy David, president and CEO of Keystone Electronics, in a statement. Keystone Electronics Corp. (www.keyelco.com) offers a comprehensive line of interconnect components and electronic hardware. The company can also provide modifications, special designs, stamping, machining, assembly services. and application-engineering support. Keystone is ISO 9001:2015 certified, with headquarters in the US and global offices in Europe, Canada, Asia and...

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Metal Finishing Company Marks 40 Years in Business

ADDISON, Ill.—Precision metal finishing specialist CRW Finishing, Inc. recently marked its 40th anniversary as a provider of advanced finishing processes. Founded in 1977, CRW Finishing operates a 15,000-square-foot plant in Addison, Illinois, that offers a range of job shop metal finishing services. The company also sells metal finishing equipment and supplies. The company’s longevity is a testament to CRW’s team of dedicated professionals. Their customer-first and forward-thinking attitudes have contributed to four decades of innovation and steady growth, the company said in a press release. In 1977, three young entrepreneurs opened a small machine shop.  By 1979, the company’s founder and president, Charles Calbeck Sr., had bought out his partners and continued operations under the name of  Concentric Reliable Works, Inc.  Since then, the business has naturally evolved to what it is today—a dedicated provider of metal finishing services, equipment, and supplies. Today, CRW Finishing, Inc. (www.crwfinishing.com) operates some of the most advanced finishing equipment and process techniques available for deburring, shot blasting, and parts washing services and equipment. The company guides customers through complex projects, including 3D printed parts, medical devices, and all parts with critical dimensions, using its drag finishing, barrel finishing, and centrifugal disk machines. The company said that its continual investment in supply, equipment, and service improvements reflect its ongoing commitment to delivering “innovative, robust solutions” for customers’ metal finishing...

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Ansys Collaborates with Innovation Works to Bring High-End Simulation Software to Startups

PITTSBURGH—Ansys has launched a collaboration with Innovation Works, an investor in seed-stage technology companies, to provide free, high-end simulation software to startups. With the collaboration, Ansys puts the speed and power of its simulation software suite into the hands of startups that otherwise could not afford the sophisticated software, but need its capabilities and flexibility to bring new products to life, Ansys said in a press release. Ansys (www.ansys.com) said that its collaboration with Innovation Works combines with other new programs and products that it has rolled out in recent months aimed at assisting startups. It also honors the company’s roots: Ansys received very early funding from Innovation Works’ predecessor organization, the Ben Franklin Technology Partner of Southwestern PA, at the company’s inception. “The global reach of the ANSYS Startup Program does not overlook our commitment to helping bring success to the burgeoning hardware startup ecosystem in our hometown of Pittsburgh,” said Paul Lethbridge, senior manager, Ansys Startup Program, in a statement. ”ANSYS simulation software helps startups throughout their entire product life-cycle, from initial concept, to prototypes, to full-scale production. Not only does early phase use of engineering simulation accelerate product innovation and development, but it also saves money and provides startups with additional credibility, often leading to more funding and broader opportunities.” “The ANSYS tools enable the startups we work with to run large-scale simulations on par with much larger...

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Airbus Installs First 3D Printed Titanium Part on Series Production Commercial Aircraft

NEW YORK—Several months ago, Airbus and Arconic achieved a 3D printing first—the installation of a 3D printed titanium bracket on a series production Airbus commercial aircraft, the A350 XWB. Arconic, a global technology, engineering, and advanced manufacturing company, announced in September that it is 3D printing these parts for Airbus’s newest widebody aircraft at Arconic’s additive manufacturing facility in Austin, Texas. “Arconic is proud to partner with Airbus to advance aerospace additive manufacturing,” said Jeremy Halford, president of Arconic Titanium and Engineered Products, in a company release. “Our comprehensive capabilities, from materials science leadership to qualification expertise, helped make this achievement possible. We look forward to continuing to advance the art of the possible in additive for aerospace.” This first installation of a 3D printed titanium part on a series production Airbus commercial aircraft marks a milestone for additive manufacturing in aerospace. Although airplane makers have been using 3D printed parts for quite some time, largely for components inside the cabin, equipping airframes with metal parts produced via additive manufacturing is new. Airbus’s installation of this 3D printed titanium bracket on a series production commercial airplane, as opposed to a test airplane, is said to mark a significant step forward in the qualification of more complex 3D printed parts for production aircraft. 3D-printed parts, including metal printed cabin brackets and bleed pipes, are already flying on Airbus A320neo and...

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Magna Puts a New Twist on Welding

TROY, Mich.—Magna has put a new twist on joining thermoplastic materials in order to help automakers cut weight and costs: torsional welding. The torsional welding process, developed by Magna (www.magna.com) for automotive applications at its exteriors plant in Liberec, Czech Republic, presents a new way to join plastics. It features a high-speed twisting motion that creates enough friction-based heat to join a plastic bracket to a thermoplastic fascia. The innovative technology achieves an approximate 10 percent weight reduction because it allows thinner materials to be joined, which, in turn, reduces material costs. Torsional welding is currently used to make the front fascia of the 2017 Skoda Octavia, and it has potential for other applications where materials of similar composition need to be joined. There may also be uses for torsional welding with the increase of advanced driver assistance systems and the development of self-driving cars. The trend will be for automotive fascias to become heavier with the increase in autonomous features, due to the addition of sensors. With torsional welding, it’s now possible to reduce weight on the outer skin and brackets so more sensors can be added without impacting the overall weight of the vehicle. The Society of Plastics Engineers’ Detroit Chapter recognized Magna’s torsional welding process with an innovation award at its TPO conference last fall in Troy, Michigan. “We seek every opportunity, from design and materials...

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Axalta Launches New High Performance, Protective Industrial Rail Car Coatings

HOUSTON—A new group of high performance, protective coatings from Axalta Coating Systems is formulated to meet the needs of the industrial rail car and transportation industry and to deliver superior protection when applied to properly prepared substrates.  Axalta recently introduced its new collection of Tufcote™ Protective Rail Car coatings, a product line that includes easy-to-apply, high-build coatings, the company said in a press release. “Rail car and transportation maintenance structures are constructed to last and need a tough, durable finish to ensure their sturdy build stays intact,” said Michael Heineman, Axalta’s vice president of rail and high performance coatings, in the release. “Our new Tufcote line’s formulations and field proven technologies yield lasting results, improving the durability, protection, and aesthetics of these substrates over time.” Axalta (www.axaltacs.com) is a global company that provides coatings for use on light OEM vehicles, commercial vehicles, and refinish applications, as well as on electric motors, buildings, and pipelines. The coatings are designed to prevent corrosion, increase productivity, and enable materials to last longer. Axalta’s expansion into the industrial rail car segment aims to provide the industry with cost-effective products that are designed to protect rail assets and transportation equipment from chemical and corrosion damage, weathering, and chipping, while still maintaining a beautiful finish. Tufcote protective coatings are well-suited for use on railcars, steel storage tanks, and heavy equipment, according to...

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DTi Study Shows 50 Percent Savings with Advanced Grommets

SOUTHBOROUGH, Mass.—Device Technologies Inc., a designer and manufacturer of wire protection, enclosure-related, and environmental protection components, released a study showing its advanced grommet edging can save time and money over an aircraft’s 30-year life cycle. The study shows that the traditional nylon grommet MS21266 is 206 percent more expensive than M22529/2 when the 30-year costs of installation, inspection, replacement, and repair are assessed. This means that M22529/2 is only 48.5 percent of the nylon grommet cost—a significant saving, the company reported in a press release. “The use of advanced avionics in aircraft has led to a proliferation of wiring harnesses and cable assemblies,” said Nick Petri, president and CEO of DTi, in a statement. “However, these advances have significantly increased the size, weight, and complexity of wiring and cable assemblies. These all need wire and cable anti-chafe protection to help ensure electronic transmissions, protect data, and preserve system integrity.” The traditional MS21266 nylon grommet is molded as a straight, stiff element, cut to length and bonded around penetrations and along edges using MEK solvent based adhesives. Installation is a multi-step, time-consuming, costly process, and it’s estimated that 10 percent require in-process rework, mostly due to poor bonding and “egg-shaping” of the grommet. DTi’s M22529/2 is said to snap onto the airframe in seconds, with no VOC paste adhesive or cure time, saving 63 percent of the direct labor and...

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Electromechanical Switches Are Designed for High Reliability

IRVINE, Calif.—A new series of electromechanical switches from Pasternack are reported to provide low insertion loss repeatability while covering broadband frequencies from DC to 40 GHz. Pasternack, a provider of RF, microwave, and millimeter wave products, has introduced 12 new models that “exhibit very low insertion loss repeatability with guaranteed levels of 0.03 to 0.05 dB over 5 to 10 million switching cycles, depending on the model,” the company said in a press release. Test and measurement applications require signal processing component performance to be highly accurate and repeatable over long periods and under extreme conditions. In automated test systems where electromechanical switches are used for signal monitoring and routing applications, every switch will add repeatability error. Electromechanical switches that exhibit low insertion loss repeatability over millions of switching cycles play a critical role to ensure that overall system measurement accuracy is maintained at optimum levels. Typical applications for these switches include test instrumentation, electronic warfare, electronic countermeasures, microwave radio, VSWT, radar, space systems, and research and development. The switches are offered in three configurations: single-pole double-throw (SPDT), single-pole four-throw (SP4T), and single-pole six-throw (SP6T). They are designed with latching actuators and features that include indicators, self-cut-off, TTL, and 50 Ohm terminations. Besides low insertion loss of 0.3 dB (with typical high isolation of 100 dB), their performance is said to include input power ratings of up to 70...

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